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Reading: Politics of Dismissal and Death: Tentacle, Necropolitics, and the Political Subject

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Research Article

Politics of Dismissal and Death: Tentacle, Necropolitics, and the Political Subject

Author:

Teddy Duncan

Keiser University, US
About Teddy
Teddy Duncan Jr., is a scholar and professor at Keiser University in Tampa, Florida. His work has been featured in The International Review of Zizek Studies and is forthcoming in The Midwest Quarterly. He can be reached at Teddyduncanjr407@gmail.com.
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Abstract

In Rita Indiana’s novel, Tentacle, the future of the Dominic Republic is postulated as bleak and dystopian: a nuclear ecological disaster has nearly ruined the ocean, colorism and racism are pervasive, Haitians are indiscriminately executed due to an unnamed “virus” (Indiana 3), and historical class divisions, as well as wealth inequalities, are maintained. The various issues that Indiana’s future-oriented Dominican Republic is facing emerge from political contingencies: they are the result of clear choices facilitated by the political leaders of the Dominican Republic. Yet, while the text renders historical reality as contingent and liable to change, it also explicitly points out the limits of individual agency and action. Tentacle demonstrates the politico-ontological dismissal of subjects that is enacted through necropolitics. The text also recognizes the contingent nature of political formation and necropolitics, and by doing so, implicitly contests the essentialization of formerly colonized countries such as the Dominican Republic. Ultimately, I argue that the precarity of the political subject and the material-political-reality are not depicted in Tentacle as necessary or inevitable parts of some dialectic process of progression, but rather as potentially preventable or intervenable processes that evade individual agency.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.26824/lalr.343
How to Cite: Duncan, T., 2022. Politics of Dismissal and Death: Tentacle, Necropolitics, and the Political Subject . Latin American Literary Review, 49(99), p.None. DOI: http://doi.org/10.26824/lalr.343
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Published on 09 Sep 2022.
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